There is no Free Lunch

It has been suggested that hydro electricity and nuclear energy are better alternatives to burning fossil fuel, because these sources do not provide emissions. Those suggestions are wrong. Continue reading

£9 Billion on a useless technology

A contract in which one party pays another £9 billion is by any accounts a big contract to land and it is also a big contract to lose. Nuclear Management Partners has lost a £9bn contract to clean up the nuclear waste site at Sellafield because, it seems, of overcharging and time delays. There was six years left on the contract when the government of the United Kingdom cancelled it. Continue reading

Leave for Warmer Climes When the Winter Comes

EDF is a French energy company. It is one of the six energy companies that control the United Kingdom’s energy supply and enjoys the rights privileges and advantages of it being part of an oligarchy. It specialises in nuclear power and has a number of nuclear generating plants which create heat by means of a chain reaction, uses the heat to make steam which drives a turbine which in turn generates electricity which in turn is fed into the national grid. The nuclear plants create nuclear waste in copious quantities which takes thousands of years to decay into a condition in which the waste in not dangerous. Continue reading

The True Cost of Nuclear Energy

Some think that nuclear energy is an important source of electricity and ought to be part of every nation’s energy generating system. Others think that nuclear energy is too dangerous to use and we should decommission nuclear power plants all over the world. I tend towards the latter view, but accept that there may be some merit in the former view. Whatever view you hold about nuclear energy everyone who thinks about it agrees that there must be a safe and perfect way of storing nuclear waste to prevent the waste being used for weapons and to prevent the waste leaking into the atmosphere or the sea or the land where it will cause harm and damage to human health and to the health of the ecosystem where the waste is stored. Continue reading

Our nuclear legacy

Every new invention brings advantages and disadvantages. Humans are usually optimistic of the advantages, and perhaps that is how they should be. However when the disadvantages and problems start to become apparent there is a tendency for humans to ignore or under state the problems and a problem ignored can easily become a dangerous crisis. Continue reading

Professor’s MacKay’s nuclear vision

It is difficult for a nation to plan its energy requirements for the future and that difficulty is made harder when that nation cannot decide upon a settled energy policy. In the United Kingdom there are so many conflicting policy proposals that I despair of the United Kingdom ever establishing an energy policy which secures energy and keeps emissions from energy to a minimum. Continue reading

Nuclear waste – what will happen to it?

The United Kingdom, through Business Secretary John Hutton, has announced a program of updating and building nuclear powered electricity generators. EDF have agreed a price to buy the existing nuclear generator, British Energy and they are busy designing plans for the new power stations, which will take many years to complete. The Government has passed laws to streamline the planning process, that troublesome way that ordinary people and groups can have their say about nuclear and other developments in their own back yards, thus preventing these plans being implemented or delayed. Everything is in place for the new nuclear age, except one thing – where do we put the nuclear waste? Continue reading