A Depressing Achievement

We are nearly there. The Mauna Loa readings of atmospheric carbon dioxide at an altitude of 3,400 metres in the Hawaiian northern subtropics recorded a mean average for May 2013 of 399.77 parts per million.   Continue reading

Piecrust Promises at Doha

The UN Climate Change Conference ended, not with a bang, but a whimper. The Kyoto Protocol has been extended until 2020, but that will make no difference to a problem that will continue long after 2020. Rich nations have sort of promised to compensate poor nations for climate change. China and India will continue to be able to create emissions unfettered by even the piecrust promise of a so called binding treaty and the world will continue much as before, with a chorus of fears for the future global warming but with very few willing to do anything to remedy the problem. Continue reading

Who regulates the climate change regulators

When he wrote about the great crash of 1929, Professor J K Galbraith wrote (and here I paraphrase his words) that it is always hard to find a way of regulating the regulators, but even harder to impart wisdom in those who should be wise. I am not going to write about the credit crunch – far too much is being written and broadcast about it in the United Kingdom, it is almost as if the journalists and broadcasters are creating a self fulfilling prophesy for the sake of a good story that sells media. No, I am going to look at Galbraith’s comments in the context of climate change. Continue reading

Global Warming Potential Index

George Orwell wrote that some animals are more equal than others; when it comes to greenhouse gases some greenhouse gases are more equal than others. When we think of climate change and greenhouse gas, we always think about carbon dioxide, and most of the articles you read stress the importance of reducing carbon dioxide emissions, because humans emit carbon dioxide into the atmosphere more than any other greenhouse gas. But carbon dioxide, although the most prevalent greenhouse gas, is not the most potent greenhouse gas. Continue reading