I am sorry we killed all those people

Mr Corbyn, who from all accounts is likely to be the next leader of the United Kingdom’s Labour Party, has promised to formally apologise on behalf of the Labour Party for taking the United Kingdom into the Iraq war. Continue reading

Publish or Be Damned

John Chilcot has not yet completed his report into the Iraq war. the reason for this really appalling delay is that Mr Chilcot is giving those that he may criticise in his report an opportunity to see a draft of his criticisms and answer them. This process is taking years.  Continue reading

Mr Blair Looks Like a Lizard

Tony Blair looks increasing like a lizard, but does not, according to accounts in the press live like one. Lizards eat flies but Mr Blair enjoys a life of opulence and luxury, which is most suitable for the former leader of the Labour Party which was formed to represent the interests of working class people. Continue reading

Throwing the Other Shoe

Politicians do not like to have eggs or tomatoes thrown at them but they ought to shrug off whatever they have had thrown at them, provided it did not hurt them. After all, it is always helpful to democracy when a politician loses some dignity. It may remind them that they are elected to serve the people and not rule over the people.

You may remember in December 2008 George Bush had shoes thrown at him while giving a press conference in Baghdad. One shoe was thrown, which missed Mr Bush and then the thrower threw the other shoe. Mr Bush was not touched by the shoes; he ducked and no harm was done except to his dignity. The shoe thrower, Iraqi journalist Muntadhar al-Zaidi, shouted that the shoes were a goodbye kiss from the Iraqi people. Continue reading

When Was Iraq A Better Place?

The Chilcot Inquiry into the Iraq War of 2003 will now not report its findings until 2016. That, of course, is quite disgraceful. The great and the good who were concerned in promoting the Iraq War desire the war to be treated as history rather than current affairs. The longer the inquiry lasts the less possibility there is of any key people in the decision making ever being called to account for their actions or face any proceedings that justice may require. Continue reading

We Should Be Ashamed

The road to hell is paved with good intentions, it is said. However there are more evil intentions in hell’s pathway than there are good intentions. Outcomes may be not what have been intended, and this may cause misery and suffering, but this is a result of lesser sins, a such as pride, arrogance and the belief that the person upon whose intent the policy has been formed is cleverer and more perceptive than that person really is. Continue reading

Chilcot: the Forest Beyond the Long Grass

In July 2009 John Chilcot opened an Inquiry into the lessons of the Iraq War. Mr Chilcot was a senior civil servant and over the past six years seems to have been singularly unfitted for the task. It was a case of the great and the good inquiring into the lies and mistakes and  scandals of the Iraq War not caused by the military but by the elected politicians and the civil servants of the time – in other words the great and the good. I would expect a civil servant to be well practiced in the art of kicking difficult problems far into the forest beyond the long grass, and Mr Chilcot has not changed my expectation by his conduct of the Inquiry.  Continue reading