Energy Companies Campaign for Lower Bills!

The energy companies have started to campaign for lower energy bills. Of course, they have not started a campaign to make themselves charge consumers less for energy. They have started a campaign for the levies for renewable energy and for insulation which are at present added as extras to the energy bills of households to be deleted from energy bills and charged and paid for out of general taxation. This means that although an individual household’s energy bill may be lower after deducting these additional subsidy costs, an individual household’s tax will be higher so there will be no practical purpose or change. The household will end up paying exactly the same amount. Continue reading

It Will be An Expensive Winter

It is going to be an expensive winter in Britain. SSE, one of the six suppliers of energy that serve around 99% of the United Kingdom energy market, has announced that from 15 November there will be an average price increase of 8.2%. This increase is about the same level of increase that energy users had to pay this time last year when all the six oligarchic energy companies increased their prices by around 5% more than inflation. Continue reading

Should Subsidies for Renewables be Paid out of Central Taxation?

Energy bills have been rising since 2005 which means that in the United Kingdom people are paying more and more each year for their electricity, gas and heating oil. The rise has been exacerbated by the government imposing levies on energy bills to pay for things like wind turbines and photovoltaic electric solar panels. Now it is being suggested that instead of the renewable subsidies being paid out of levies on electricity bills, they should be paid out of central taxation. Is this suggestion the right way to deal with subsidies for renewables. Continue reading

How to Save on Fuel Bills: Solar Water Heating

The Government of the United Kingdom has announced that it will enact legislation to force energy companies to offer no more than four tariffs and to advise their customers of the cheapest tariff. At a time when energy companies are making record profits from record margins the change is long overdue. Sometime son energy companies will no longer be able to confuse customers with a plethora of tariffs and they will be forced to abandon the so called legacy tariffs under which someone that has not to time or to skill to understand that the tariff they are paying is ridiculously high. Continue reading

Budgeting for energy prices in 2020

Many people are having difficulty in paying their energy bills. Some estimates by independent sources claim that a quarter of the households are finding it hard to budget for the energy bills, although presumably these households are having problems in paying all their bills in these difficult times. Continue reading

Annual £5,000 energy bill for households in ten years time

The average household in the United Kingdom in 2004 was paying £580 a year for its household energy bills, usually its gas and electricity bills. Today that figure has slightly more than doubled with the average household paying £1,243 a year. Recent calculations by Ernst & Young, one of the world’s top accounting firms, indicate that by 2020 the average UK household is likely to be paying around £5,000 a year for its energy – that is to say its electricity, its gas (or oil or other energy source). If you will be approaching retirement in 2020 you may well need a specific pension pot, just to keep warm. Continue reading