A Bear of Very Little Brain

I wonder why in the United Kingdom the intellectual capacity of ministers and civil servants who deal with energy issues is so low. I know that I am being unusually rude, but energy and the environment are too important issues to have bears of very little brain in charge of policy.

Avid readers of these essays will know that I have always been opposed to wood burning power stations and will know the reason is that they cause terrible environmental damage. Continue reading

The Renewable Heat Incentive

It is just not possible to run a renewable heat business in the United Kingdom.  Government politicians Mr Greg Barker and Mr Ed Davey who are in charge of renewable heat policies simply cannot be trusted to tell the truth when they publish a plan and they certainly cannot be trusted to stick to their announcement. You cannot simply believe anything that the Department of Energy and Climate Change publishes on its website about its plans for the Renewable Heat Incentive. Continue reading

What Energy Policy?

I listened to the United Kingdom’s Energy Minister, Mr Ed Davey, speak on the radio about the proposals for nuclear energy. He spoke about the need for investors to see a clear return on their investment within a settled and predictable framework and that by putting a levy on electricity bills investors in the nuclear industry would see a clear guaranteed return (guaranteed by the consumer no less) and would therefore invest in the building of new nuclear electricity generating plants. It is a statement which sounds logical but is full of inaccuracies and has a great measure of hypocrisy. Continue reading

The Answer is Probably Not Blowing In the Wind

Now that Mr Huhne has resigned as Energy and Climate Change Secretary, his successor, Mr Davey, will be tested by a growing feeling that we are spending too much on subsidising wind farms. The one hundred Conservative Members of Parliament who have written to the prime Minister to argue that wind farms are over subsidised in these difficult economic time are right. The intermittency of the energy that wind turbines produces and the lack of any possibility of storing surplus energy makes it difficult to justify the present wind farm programme. Continue reading