Protests about climate change

On Friday many school children gave up a day’s worth of education to protest that governments are not doing enough to combat climate change. It is an odd thing to do.

First and foremost these school children only learned about climate change from their education. To give up a day’s worth of learning is an odd sacrifice to make, if it was regarded by the school children as a sacrifice. Giving up a day’s schooling is not hard work – when i was at school I would have welcomed it, not looked on it as a sacrifice.

If the children gave up a day’s holiday to protest about climate change I could understand that as a possibly worthy sacrifice but I have doubts about the effectiveness of protest and it is clear that most forms of protest, such as trying to close the port of Dover, will create more emissions than if they let the port alone.

I would be impressed and appreciative if the children gave up a day’s holiday to take measures personally to reduce rapid climate change and environmental damage, such as planting trees, or picking up plastic from beaches, rivers, watercourses and sending the plastic to be recycled, spending their holidays thinking about solutions to prevent the climate extinction they fear, instead of protesting that politicians and others are not doing the thinking for them.

Planting trees and cleaning up is harder work than joining a protest.

Today’s Weather will be Tomorrow’s Climate

When I started writing essays about the environment, many years ago, I was always careful to point out the difference between climate and weather. Climate, like class in a sports person, is permanent. Weather is akin to form, a temporary phenomenon. As I write these words the United Kingdom is experiencing its hottest July ever recorded and will probably, before the day is out enjoy or suffer (as the case may be) its highest recorded temperature ever. Continue reading