The Waterfall Built of Rock

I first went toCyprus, the place of birth of my father in 1961, when I was twelve years old. I was struck by the arid and rocky landscape, compared withGreece. We visited the village of my father, Amiandos, which is over a thousand metres above sea level in the Troodos mountains. On one mountain side of the village was what looked to me like a waterfall built of rock. Continue reading

Migration and climate change

Invasion, conquest and occupation are features of human history. The British Empire was either acquired or held together by the force of arms.  And as Britain acquired such territories as India, Pakistan, Cyprus, the islands of the West Indies it sent its people to those places to exploit the wealth, resources and industry of the people who lived there. Exploitation was on a massive scale with the people of the Empire mostly being denied the basic decencies of life – the vote, the right to learn and freedom – on account of the colour of their skins or the race to which they belonged. Continue reading

Older generations

Cyprus is one of the countries that I love. It is dusty, very hot and full of friendly people to whom hospitality is an integral part of their lifestyle.  The island was named after the copper that came from there in ancient times, and was used by the ancient Greeks to make their armour and weapons of bronze. 

My father came from Cyprus and he was brought up in a village called Amiandos, Greek for asbestos.  The old asbestos mines were created at the turn of the last century and the village of Amiandos established to serve the mines. In those days the health problems associated with asbestos were not well known and as a young boy my father, in common with other villagers mined asbestos for a Danish company that owned the mine. Continue reading