Comforts of Old Age and the BBC will not be one of them

I was looking forward to reaching the age of 75 because at that stage I would not need to pay the BBC licence fee; it would be a small comfort but a welcome one. Unlike many older people the decision by the BBC only to waive licence fees for the elderly who are on pension credit will not cause me hardship, but it will cause hardship to probably hundreds of thousands of older people who have over a lifetime paid thousands of pounds to the BBC which has enabled it to broadcast its programmes and pay huge salaries and benefits to executives and those it calls “talent”.There is no opt out for viewers who must pay the fee whether or not they watch BBC programmes. Continue reading

Freedom Matters

“Freedom is always, and exclusively, freedom for the one who thinks differently”, as one political thinker noted. That thinker also said “Without general elections, without unrestricted freedom of press and assembly, without a free struggle of opinion, life dies out in every public institution, becomes a mere semblance of life, in which only the bureaucracy remains as the active element.”

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The Economics of Brexit

I am not an economist but simply listen to economists as they make their analyses and predictions. I do this because they are widely reported and hardly a day goes by without some learned person making some kind of prediction about our future prosperity. Continue reading

Must Try Harder

As I get older so the proportion of atmospheric carbon dioxide, like my age, increases. the ESRL Global Monitoring Division at Muana Loa, Hawaii,  reports atmospheric carbon dioxide is now at 414.66 parts per million compared with 411.24 ppm just a year ago in May 2018.

It is very sad to have to report this, Continue reading

Immigrants and Attitudes

The attitude of the indigenous population of the United Kingdom towards immigrants is changing. In April, an Ipsos Mori survey found immigration was a concern for 11% of people – the lowest level since 2001. Concern reached its highest level in 2016 when the Brexit referendum was being held. Why the change? Continue reading

Undemocratic Voting

Most of the people of the United Kingdom will today make their way to polling booths to vote for the election of members to the European Union’s Parliament nearly three years after the majority of the people of the United Kingdom had voted to leave the European Union. This is hardly democracy in action.

Those who oppose Brexit Continue reading

I’ll see you in court, but where is the court?

Bringing justice (or at least law) to the people has always been one of the prime duties of any government. Governments can only function on the basis that the law will mostly be obeyed and that the rule of law will prevail and that the rule of law is without exceptions; it applies to the ordinary citizen and to the government. If the people cannot have their cases promptly and efficiently heard, or if the hearing of those cases is too expensive for people to pay, then the rule of law is damaged, badly.

At one time governments organised the dispensing of justice to try those accused of crime and to settle disputes by arranging for a group of justices (with counsel and other legal people, to tour sections of the country on assizes. Continue reading