Can You Spare a Dime?

Economists claim that our present hard times are even worse than those of the late 1920s. They may be right, but eighty or so years ago times were certainly tough. People who had fought in the Great War, and then had productive employment in jobs of which they were proud were suddenly without work. They sang

“Once I built a railroad

I made it run

Made it race against time”.

Today, most of the jobless folk in the West are not people who have ever had work, but people, young people who have never had work. These youngsters have studied with a dream of making a good living in productive work, but find now there are no opportunities.

There are massive rates of unemployed young in almost every country. Their dreams which they wish to follow are now confused and indistinct, and those kinds of dreams are dangerous.

We have encouraged the young to get an education, to mortgage their futures but have directed them into studying, in some cases, things which do not prepare them for work. Instead of directing those young people into learning trades we have provide education in media studies.

They cannot sing

Once I built a tower up to the sun

Brick and rivet and lime”.

But like those unemployed of eighty years ago the young of today still say

“Brother, can you spare a dime?”

They are holding out their hands, not to well off passers-by, but to whatever collective welfare that the state may be able to provide, and it is our fault.

They cannot sing
“Once I built a tower up to the sun
Brick and rivet and lime”.
But like those unemployed of eighty years ago the young of today still say
“Brother, can you spare a dime?”
They are holding out their hands, not to well off passers-by, but to whatever collective welfare that the state may be able to provide, and it is our fault.